Over 66% of Americans Think They Could 'Live Off the Land'

Two-thirds of surveyed Americans are confident they could “live off the land” if all other alternatives had become exhausted.

One-third of the armchair farmers think they could even last over a year self sufficiently, Talker reported.

The survey — which interviewed over 1,000 US rural residents and another thousand from cities and suburbs — also found that two-thirds from both walks of life say they “wouldn’t have any problem” growing their own produce had grocery stores closed nationwide.

Of course, the seemingly least qualified believe they are the cream of the crop when it comes to this newfound spirit of self-assured Americana.

City folks fancy themselves to be the most confident self-sustaining farmhands — 72% of urban and suburbanites told the survey they would be veggie sufficient whereas just 62% of rural residents feel the same.

But even those not ready to open their own farmers market are taking steps to become literally homegrown.

The survey found that eight in 10 Americans believe possessing a “green thumb” is a needed survival skill, which inspired 42% of them to begin growing their own produce. Even 31% said they’ve caught interest in raising livestock.

Nearly half of respondents also say they would start their own farm hobby — if they had the time, area and resources.

And all it took was a pandemic for people to get in touch with their inner country.

About one in five confessed to leaving their cities and surrounding suburbs for a rural setting during COVID — and 69% desire to do the same for a plethora of reasons.

Of that ambitious grouping, the results showed that 61% would leave because the great outdoors is more peaceful, 49% call it less stressful and 45% flat out said it’s a cheaper cost of living.

But some have concerns that developing a green thumb will cost them green from their bank accounts.

Although more than half say they have picked up a sustainable hobby, 40% are skittish about the lifestyle due to fears of the expenses that come with caring for mother nature.

SOURCE


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